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Donald Abrams, MD, Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of California at San Francisco and Cheryl A. Jay, MD, Director of the San Francisco General Hospital Neurology Clinic, et al., stated the following in their Sep. 9-10, 2005 abstract titled "Smoked Cannabis Therapy for HIV-Related Painful Peripheral Neuropathy: Results of a Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial," presented at the International Assocation for Cannabis as Medicine (IACM) 3rd Conference on Cannabinoids in Medicine:

“There is significant evidence that cannabinoids may be involved in the modulation of pain, especially of neuropathic origin. HIV-related painful peripheral neuropathy is a significant medical problem with unsatisfactory treatment options. Based on the effects of cannabinoids in preclinical models of neuropathic pain and anecdotal case reports, a controlled trial of smoked cannabis was conducted…

Thirteen of the 25 patients who were randomized to marijuana cigarettes reported greater then 30% reduction in pain during the intervention phase, compared with 6 of the 25 patients receiving placebo cigarettes…

Smoked marijuana is effective in reducing chronic ongoing neuropathic pain as well as acute pain in the experimental pain model. The magnitude of the response of the neuropathic pain is similar to what is seen with gabapentin, a widely used therapeutic intervention for HIV neuropathy.”

Sep. 9-10, 2005